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April 16, 2008

Comments

Over the years I have certainly heard artists talk about their work as being the kind that has some shock value, generally as a way of bombarding the viewer with the message that they are trying to convey. Oddly enough I find works like these and other book artists you've featured to be emotionally shocking to me. I love them and I think they are wildly creative and interesting but the part of me that loves and treasures books, that treats them with the utmost respect and keeps them nice and new looking while reading them over and over again, aches to see this stuff done to books. It is a fascinating sensation and one that I feel a bit silly about and yet enjoy at the same time. It is oddly delightful to feel myself drawn to this work so strongly, enjoying the textures and the shapes and the colors and yet feeling this heartsick feeling at the same time. I'm sure I'm out on a limb in this but I thought I'd share the experience in the event that I wasn't alone in feeling this way.

Carl,

I feel the same way - I want to cringe and celebrate at the same time. The book in the aquarium makes me catch my breath as if I am watching a strange fish, yet part of my mind wants to scream.

You might also enjoy Su Blackwell's "book-cut sculptures":

http://www.sublackwell.co.uk/

She went to her books with a pair of scissors and produced something absolutely beautiful and ephemeral.

Daniel

Thanks Daniel, I'll check out her site. Have you seen Brian Dettmer's?:

http://centripetalnotion.com/2007/09/13/13:26:26/

I believe Endicott posted his work here recently.

Carl, I'd heard of Dettmer's work but had never actually taken a look. Thanks for that link! Book autopsies! How horrifying and breathtakingly beautiful. I will explore his gallery more and will probably list it as our featured site in the next Dante's Heart newsletter.

Do you know the poet Karl Young's work? I think he may have begun the book arts - I am not sure if there were earlier predecessors. His work included "Book Worn As Earring" and a beautiful accordion book - books reimagined as utile objects for other purposes.

By the way, I checked out your blog - it's very beautiful, and I love the title.

Carl, I'd heard of Dettmer's work but had never actually taken a look. Thanks for that link! Book autopsies! How horrifying and breathtakingly beautiful. I will explore his gallery more and will probably list it as our featured site in the next Dante's Heart newsletter.

Do you know the poet Karl Young's work? I think he may have begun the book arts - I am not sure if there were earlier predecessors. His work included "Book Worn As Earring" and a beautiful accordion book - books reimagined as utile objects for other purposes.

By the way, I checked out your blog - it's very beautiful, and I love the title.

Hhmmm ....It would be interesting to see a sapling taking root from one of those olden books [ it would be neat also if the book is about trees ] ....

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About this blog

  • The Journal of Mythic Arts was a pioneering online magazine dedicated to Mythic Arts: literary, visual, and performance arts inspired by myth, folklore, and fairy tales. Published by The Endicott Studio, co-edited by Terri Windling & Midori Snyder, JoMA ran from 1997 to 2008.

    This blog was active from 2006 - 2008, and is kept online as an archive only. Please note that no new material has been posted since 2008, and links have not been updated.

    For more recent discussions of Mythic Arts, fantasy literature, and related topics, visit Terri Windling's Myth & Moor and Midori Snyder's Into the Labyrinth.

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